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Inquest Costs: Separately Recoverable under the Fixed Recoverable Costs Regime

<!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) has responded to the July 2023 consultation confirming that the costs of inquest proceedings will be recoverable separately, and the change will be inserted at CPR 45.1 (9) and come into force on 6 April 2024.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>In the consultation, which opened on 21 July 2023 and closed on 8 September, the MoJ had indicated a provisional view that the costs of inquests should be separately recoverable to the FRC, and subject to assessment, if these costs were reasonable and proportionate. And in making the rule change, the MoJ has confirmed that inquest costs should only be recoverable to the extent that they would be anyway, outside of FRC.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The consultation highlighted recognition by the MoJ that as part of any proper investigation process, an inquest will typically pre-date, and may (to an extent at least) enable the litigation.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>In the multi-track, where FRC will not apply, the costs involved in an inquest can be recoverable.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The MoJ also acknowledged as part of the consultation that without the addition of a new rule in the CPR to provide for the separate recoverability of inquest costs in FRC cases, that the level of costs involved in the inquest would make the pursuit of any claim for compensation uneconomic.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>There were 74 responses to the consultation, which included a joint response from the Bar Council and the Personal Injuries Bar Association (PIBA). With the addition of this new rule for inquest costs, there appears to be recognition by the MOJ of the position outlined in the joint response from the Bar Council and PIBA that:</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:list --> <ul><!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Inquests are an integral part of the process for investigating unnatural deaths and will inform and facilitate decisions taken about civil proceedings.</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>It would be wrong to be overly prescriptive in defining the cases when inquests costs ought to be recoverable. Those claims that may be made following an inquest are not limited to claims for dependency under the Fatal Accidents Act 1976. There will be claims on behalf of the estate under the Law Reform (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1934; and accidents involving fatalities which found claims for family and non-family members for psychiatric injury as primary and secondary victims. Claims involving the deaths of children and young adults can be complex, but the damages recoverable can be limited to the levels set out in the Fast and Intermediate tracks.</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Many cases involving inquests will be complex. There will be some cases when the facts of an inquest greatly assist the determination of civil liability, and admissions may be made, and judgment entered. These cases may be suitable for the Intermediate Track as a result. It is important that the CPR allow for inquest costs to be recovered in these circumstances.</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --></ul> <!-- /wp:list --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The addition of the new rule to allow the costs of inquests proceedings to be recovered separately clearly addresses the wide concern shared by many, including the MoJ, that the FRC rules as previously drafted may have impeded solicitors’ ability to pursue claims, and therefore may have impacted on the future ability of bereaved families to obtain representation unless they were able to fund this, wholly or in part, themselves. The new rule will therefore be seen as a positive step for access to representation in the inquest process.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p><em>Leila Benyounes is Head of the Inquests Team&nbsp;at Parklane Plowden Chambers and&nbsp;is ranked </em> <em>as a leading junior in Legal 500 and Chambers and Partners for Inquests and Inquiries. Leila’s full profile can be accessed </em><a href="https://www.parklaneplowden.co.uk/barristers/leila-benyounes"><em>here</em></a></p> <!-- /wp:paragraph -->

Inadequate Triage and Missed Opportunities for Assessment at Hospital: Woman’s death caused by severe pain hours after hospital discharge

<!-- wp:paragraph --> <p><a href="https://www.parklaneplowden.co.uk/our-barristers/leila-benyounes/">Leila Benyounes</a> represented the family of a 63-year-old lady who suffered an acute cardiac arrhythmia due to severe pain hours after she had been discharged from hospital in May 2022.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The deceased, a former fitness instructor with a medical history of osteoarthritis to her right hip, had awoken with extreme pain to her right hip and required Entonox and intravenous morphine prior to transfer to hospital by ambulance.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>It was held at the inquest that the triage within the emergency department was inadequate, did not include a pain score or pull through significant information onto the hospital records, including the opiate analgesia prescribed by the paramedics. It was also held that there was an under-triage of the deceased’s condition, and it was appropriate for the deceased to be admitted for a mobility assessment prior to discharge which did not occur.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>It was found that the death was due to a cardiac arrhythmia caused by acute adrenaline excess, as a result of the severe pain the deceased was experiencing to her right hip.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>A narrative conclusion was recorded at the inquest in which it was held that there was an inadequate triage and missed opportunities for assessment at hospital.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Leila was instructed by Victoria Wanless at <a href="https://www.beechampeacock.co.uk/">Beacham Peacock Solicitors</a>.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p><em>Leila Benyounes is Head of the Inquests Team at Parklane Plowden Chambers and is ranked as Band 1 by Legal 500 for Inquests and Inquiries. Leila has been appointed to the Attorney General’s Treasury Counsel Panel A since 2010. Leila is appointed as Assistant Coroner for Gateshead and South Tyneside. Leila regularly represents interested persons in a wide range of inquests including Article 2 jury inquests and complex medical matters.  Her full profile can be accessed <a href="https://www.parklaneplowden.co.uk/barristers/leila-benyounes">here</a>.</em></p> <!-- /wp:paragraph -->

Emma Bennett appears in a 2-week jury inquest following a death in police custody

<!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>On 4 September 2021 a young man sadly died whilst being held in police custody after he swallowed a large plastic bag filled with cocaine and heroin.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Immediately prior to his death, the man, a drug dealer, had been searched and arrested on grounds of possession of a small quantity of drugs. However, whilst being held in the rear of a police van, CCTV footage showed him to produce from his trouser pocket a further undiscovered much larger quantity of drugs and which he placed in his mouth.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Upon the realisation by the police of that fact in the custody suite, the man inhaled the bag and died from obstruction of his airways despite the attempts of the public ambulance service and the private ambulance service, for whom Emma acted, to resuscitate him.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Potential criticisms at the 2- week jury inquest before Senior Coroner for East London Mr Graeme Irvine centred on failures by the police to identify the bag of drugs in the initial search and on the ambulance services for failing to resuscitate the man.&nbsp;</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The jury heard extensive witness evidence over a number of days including from the Home Office pathologist and from a witness giving evidence from Thailand, in respect of which issues of the decision in <a href="https://www.judiciary.uk/guidance-and-resources/practice-direction-taking-evidence-from-overseas-in-cases-before-the-special-immigration-appeals-commission/"><em>Agbakiaka</em></a> (<em>evidence from abroad; Nare guidance</em>) [2021] UKUT 286 (IAC) were engaged.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Their findings were that the police’s conduct, by failing to perform a thorough search contributed to the man’s death as did his own conduct for swallowing the bag of drugs.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>In respect of the ambulance services, the jury found that by the time of their arrival the man was not breathing, had no pulse and was in cardiac arrest. His chance of survival was accordingly very poor and there had been no contribution by the ambulance services to his death.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Whilst a sad case for all concerned, from a practitioner’s perspective the inquest is of interest because of issues raised by it as to medical causation and contribution to a death as well as the nature of both the search and resuscitation protocols to be followed by the emergency services.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Emma Bennett is an experienced advocate with a previous background of criminal trial advocacy in the most serious cases. She has appeared in a number of high profile and factually complex inquests over the last 12 months. Details of her recent work can be found in her chambers profile <a href="https://www.parklaneplowden.co.uk/our-barristers/emma-bennett/">here</a>.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Emma was instructed by Director, <a href="https://dwfgroup.com/en/people/r/rebecca-wyld">Rebecca Wyld</a> at DWF who is highly respected for her work in inquests and inquiries on behalf of public and private bodies in the healthcare sector.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The case has received attention in the press including by the <a href="https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-68034516">BBC</a> the <a href="https://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/police-watchdog-man-choked-drugs-death-met-police-custody-b1133620.html">Evening Standard</a>, on the <a href="https://www.policeconduct.gov.uk/news/met-officer-failed-properly-search-or-monitor-man-who-died-custody-after-choking-drugs">police conduct website</a> and the <a href="https://www.doughtystreet.co.uk/news/jury-find-police-failings-contributed-death-man-police-custody">website</a> of the lawyers who appeared for the family.&nbsp;</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph -->

Abigail Telford represented the family in the inquest of Kyle Lewis

<!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Abigail Telford, instructed by <a href="https://www.howellsllp.com/staff/amy-fiddler/">Amy Fiddler</a> at Howells LLP recently acted on behalf of the family in the inquest of Kyle Lewis.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Kyle Lewis, aged five, died on the 28 October 2022 after inhaling a drawing pin at his uncle’s house in Rotherham. An inquest at Doncaster Coroner's Court on January 18<sup>th</sup> found Kyle’s death to be an accident.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>On BBC Look North, in a statement read outside court by Abigail Telford, on behalf of Kyle’s family “As a family we want to thank Leeds for the care and compassion they showed to us. During Kyle’s final hours and days, they let us lay in bed and cuddle Kyle. They would play Jurassic World to him as they knew it was his favourite. Nothing was too much as they knew every minute and second with Kyle was so important as it could be our last.” Watch the news story <a href="https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m001vgyf/look-north-yorkshire-evening-news-18012024">here</a>.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The full statement read out on behalf of the family by Abigail is mentioned in the Sheffield Star, you can read the full story in the Sheffield Star Newspaper <a href="https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/world/kyle-lewis-death-of-boy-5-who-passed-away-after-swallowing-a-drawing-pin-ruled-to-be-accidental/ar-AA1ncLrB">here</a>.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph -->

Parklane Plowden Chambers ranked across seven practice areas in the Chambers and Partners 2024 rankings

<!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Parklane Plowden Chambers has been ranked as a Band 1 set across five practice areas and a Band 2 set across two further areas in the Chambers and Partners 2024 rankings.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Chambers has been ranked as Band 1, the highest ranking a Chambers can achieve, across the Chancery; Clinical Negligence; Employment; Family: Children and Personal Injury practice areas.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Additionally, the set has been ranked as Tier 2 for both Family: Matrimonial Finance and Inquests &amp; Public Inquiries.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The individual barrister members received 65 rankings in this year’s edition across:</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:list --> <ul><!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Chancery</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Clinical Negligence</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Costs Litigation</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Employment</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Family: Children </li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Family: Matrimonial Finance </li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Inquests &amp; Public Inquiries</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Motor Insurance Fraud</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Personal Injury</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Personal Injury: Industrial Disease</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Professional Negligence </li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Real Estate Litigation</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --></ul> <!-- /wp:list --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>In addition to his Band 1 Personal Injury ranking, <a href="https://www.parklaneplowden.co.uk/our-barristers/andrew-axon/">Andrew Axon</a> has once again retained his individual Clinical Negligence ranking of 'Star Individual'.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p></p> <!-- /wp:paragraph -->

Parklane Plowden Chambers named as a Tier 1 barristers’ set across five practice areas in the Legal 500 2024 rankings

<!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Parklane Plowden Chambers has been ranked as a Tier 1 set across five practice areas and a Tier 2 set across one area in The Legal 500 2024 rankings.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Chambers has been named as Tier 1, the highest ranking a Chambers can achieve, across chancery, probate and tax; clinical negligence; employment; family and children law and personal injury practice areas.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Parklane Plowden is also the only set to be ranked for chancery, probate and tax and clinical negligence on the North Eastern circuit.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Additionally, the set has been ranked as Tier 2 for inquests &amp; inquiries.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The individual barrister members received 79 rankings in this year’s edition across:</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:list --> <ul><!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Court of Protection and Community Care </li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Chancery, Probate and Tax</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Clinical Negligence</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Commercial Litigation</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Employment</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Family: Children and Domestic Violence </li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Family: Divorce and Financial Remedy </li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Personal Injury</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Property and Construction</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Professional Negligence </li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Inquests and Inquiries</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --></ul> <!-- /wp:list --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p></p> <!-- /wp:paragraph -->

Bronia Hartley represents family of Melvyn Blount who took his life after the onset of an acute episode of mental ill-health

<!-- wp:paragraph --> <p><a href="https://www.parklaneplowden.co.uk/our-barristers/bronia-hartley/">Bronia Hartley</a>, instructed by <a href="https://www.leighday.co.uk/">Leigh Day</a>, represented the family of Melvyn Blount (known as Mel) who took his life after the onset of an acute episode of mental ill-health.  </p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>HM Assistant Coroner Susan Evans found that there were missed opportunities by Mel’s GP practice in the days before his death to explore whether he was suffering an acute psychotic episode, to refer him to the crisis team or A&amp;E and to warn his family not to leave him alone.&nbsp;These missed opportunities were found to have contributed to Mel’s death.&nbsp; </p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The Coroner issued a Prevention of Future Deaths report in relation to the GP surgery’s practices in relation to warning patients about the potential side effects of medication.&nbsp;The inquest heard that Mel was not told about a drug alert which included information relating to the potentially increased risk of suicidal ideation in patients taking the sedative/hypnotic sleep medication that he was prescribed four days before his death. </p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Further detail can be found <a href="https://www.leighday.co.uk/news/news/2023-news/inquest-into-the-death-of-melvyn-blount-aged-64/">here</a>. </p> <!-- /wp:paragraph -->

Inquests and the Fixed Recoverable Costs Reforms: To Be or Not to Be?

<!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Access to representation in the inquest process in relation to costs recoverability presently hangs in the balance as the final government proposals following the July MoJ consultation on Fixed Recoverable Costs (FRC) are awaited. Amongst other issues, the recoverability of inquest costs in Fatal Accident Act cases is part of the FRC consultation.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The consultation opened on 21 July 2023 and closed recently on 08 September. The MoJ has indicated a provisional view that a new rule should provide that for cases allocated to the Fast Track and to the Intermediate Track, the costs of inquests should be separately recoverable to the FRC, and subject to assessment, if these costs were reasonable and proportionate.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The FRC will come into force imminently on 01 October for cases issued, or a cause of action accruing, after this date and there is still no decision in respect of a new or amended rule regarding the recoverability of inquest costs.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The consultation highlighted recognition by the MoJ that as part of any proper investigation process, an inquest will typically pre-date, and may (to an extent at least) enable the litigation.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>In the multi-track, where FRC will not apply, the costs involved in an inquest can be recoverable.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The MoJ has acknowledged as part of the consultation that without the addition of a new rule in the CPR to provide for the separate recoverability of inquest costs in FRC cases that the level of costs involved in the inquest will make the pursuit of any claim for compensation uneconomic.&nbsp; Indeed, in such circumstance if a bereaved individual’s claim is pursued, they will need to fund most of (if not all) of the costs involved in the representation at the inquest.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The MoJ welcomed general views on its proposals. The Bar Council and the Personal Injuries Bar Association (PIBA) provided a joint response indicating agreement with the MoJ that this is an issue which needs to be addressed and an amended rule should allow for inquest costs to be separately recoverable to FRC subject to assessment.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The joint response of the Bar Council and PIBA was that:</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:list --> <ul><!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Inquests are an integral part of the process for investigating unnatural deaths and will inform and facilitate decisions taken about civil proceedings. The rules should allow for such costs to be recovered in a civil claim to which FRC applies, bringing the Fast and Intermediate Tracks into line with the Multi Track in which such costs are recoverable.&nbsp;</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>It would be wrong to be overly prescriptive in defining the cases when inquests costs ought to be recoverable. Those claims that may be made following an inquest are not limited to claims for dependency under the Fatal Accidents Act 1976. There will be claims on behalf of the estate under the Law Reform (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1934; and accidents involving fatalities which found claims for family and non-family members for psychiatric injury as primary and secondary victims. Claims involving the deaths of children and young adults can be complex, but the damages recoverable can be limited to the levels set out in the Fast and Intermediate tracks.</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Many cases involving inquests will be complex, and they should fall outside both the Intermediate and Fast Tracks. The CPR have recognised that claims brought by dependants under the Fatal Accidents Act are complex, and these should be excluded from the Fast Track. The Bar Council would support a rule to that effect. The Bar Council is less sure about to what extent such cases should also be excluded from the Intermediate Track. There will be some cases when the facts of an inquest greatly assist the determination of civil liability, and admissions may be made, and judgment entered. These cases may be suitable for the Intermediate Track as a result. It is important that the CPR allow for inquest costs to be recovered in these circumstances.</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>The Bar Council appreciates that drafting such a rule is not straightforward but is particularly concerned that it is important the recoverability of inquests costs is dealt with promptly so such costs can be recovered when the new rules take effect on 01 October 2023.</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --></ul> <!-- /wp:list --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>It is clear that implementation of FRC will have a significant impact on litigation. The MoJ has acknowledged that the FRC rules as currently drafted may impede solicitors’ ability to pursue claims, and therefore may equally impact on the future ability of bereaved families to obtain representation unless they are able to fund this, wholly or in part, themselves. Therefore the final outcome for the FRC proposals and the rules in relation to inquests are eagerly awaited.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p><em><a href="https://www.parklaneplowden.co.uk/our-barristers/leila-benyounes/">Leila Benyounes</a> is Head of the Inquests Team at Parklane Plowden Chambers and is ranked as a leading junior in Legal 500 and Chambers and Partners for Inquests and Inquiries. Leila’s full profile can be accessed </em><a href="https://www.parklaneplowden.co.uk/barristers/leila-benyounes"><em>here</em></a>.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph -->

Treating physical illness in mental health patients

<!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Richard Copnall represented the family of Corinne Haslam at the inquest in March 2023.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The coroner has now issued a prevention of future death report to the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The inquest explored the challenges typically faced by patients who are detained under the Mental Health Act (and in the care of NHS Trust A), but who also require treatment for a physical condition (provided by NHS Trust B).</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>In the present case, both trusts operated on the same site at Tameside Hospital, but from different buildings.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Mrs Haslam suffered from a respiratory condition. On a number of occasions, Trust A’s doctors sent Mrs Haslam to Trust B’s A&amp;E department only for her to be discharged back to Trust A. On the final occasion, her condition deteriorated in A&amp;E and Mrs Haslam died.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The coroner’s report identified the following concerns:</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:list {"ordered":true,"type":"a"} --> <ol type="a"><!-- wp:list-item --> <li>The difficulty faced by Trust A’s doctors in obtaining the input of Trust B’s doctors, without having to transfer the patient to A&amp;E;</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>A&amp;E departments are typically busy environments which may not be conducive to delivering care to patients experiencing severe and enduring mental illness;</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --> <!-- wp:list-item --> <li>Trust A and Trust B operate incompatible systems for their medical records which obstructed the transfer of information and is inherently risky.</li> <!-- /wp:list-item --></ol> <!-- /wp:list --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The division of care for physical and mental health conditions between two different NHS trusts is the norm and the difficulties highlighted in the coroner’s report are typical.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The Secretary of State’s response, which is required by 15 September 2023, is eagerly awaited.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>The prevention of future deaths report can be viewed <a href="https://www.judiciary.uk/prevention-of-future-death-reports/corinne-haslam-prevention-of-future-deaths-report/">here</a>.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:paragraph --> <p>Richard was instructed by <a href="https://www.isonharrison.co.uk/our-people/gareth-naylor/">Gareth Naylor</a> of Ison Harrison.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph -->